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HV Episodes

Hearing Voices from NPR weekly hours 2012-2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

September

2012-09-26 142 Solidod: An Apache Original

The Life and Times of Solidod, the last remaining member of her village of Mescalero Apache who lived on the edge of Death Valley. Listen…

2012-09-19 116 Homeless: Living on the Streets

The voices of people who were or are homeless: Carmen Delzell takes “Crazy John” into her home. Scott Carrier spends a night in DC “Gospel Mission” shelter. The “Land of 10,000 Homeless” is a Minneapolis music/audio documentary project. Dmae Roberts interviews a young homeless girl in “Miracle on the Streets.” The Homeless Writers Coalition performs poetry put to music. Homeless people tell their stories to StoryCorps. And the Kitchen Sisters visit with street and low-income people whose main cooking utensil is the the “George Foreman Grill.” Listen…

2012-09-12 128 Prisoners of War: Battle of the Bulge

In December 1944 the Allies were closing in on Germany. HHitler had a desperate plan to save the Third Reich, a massive assault he believed would so demoralize that the Allies, they would seek a separate peace, leaving only the Russian army on the eastern front. On December 16 the Germans unleashed an offensive that would become the most brutal battle of the European war: the Battle of the Bulge. Nineteen thousand Americans were killed, about the same number were taken prisoner. We hear from four Americans soldiers about their time — before, during and after — in a German POW camp. Listen…

2012-09-05 141 Ayahuasqueros: Amazon Shamans

In May 2012, Soundwalk Collective traveled into the heart of the Peruvian Amazon to document the ancient chanting rituals of the Ayahuasquero, the Master Shaman and practitioner of plant medicine. The shaman consumes a potent brew made from the Ayahuasca, a sacred vine of the Amazonian jungle, the “vine of the souls”. The brew induces a powerful psychedelic experience that causes visual and auditory hallucinations. This hour we present a radio essay by anthropologist Jeremy Narby, a impressionistic mix of the recordings of the Collective’s time with this plant and these people. Listen…

August

2012-08-29 140 John Cage: September 5 1912 – August 12 1992

A tribute to the composer on his 100th birthday: We listen in on a 1942 John Cage radio play, “The City Wears a Slouch Hat.” We have a vox-pop asking “Who’s John Cage?”; an audio illustration by Jay Allison of a “John Cage and Merce Cunningham” collaboration; an excerpt from the film “John Cage: Ecoute (Listen)”; and, from the series Echoes, “Thoughts in Sound: John Cage- Imaginary Landscapes.” Laurie Anderson and Ken Nordine offer homages to the composer. And we hear Cage’s “In a Landscape,” Suite for Toy Piano, and “Variations IV.” Listen…

2012-08-22 139 Sports Report: Athletic Endeavor

Producer Scott Carrier’s wife learned early, in her “Swimming Lessons,” to skim beautifully across the water. The National Track and Field Hall of Fame commissioned sound-artist Ben Rubin to make audio art from interviews with athletes, who tell themselves “We Believe We Are Invincible.” Like many gay men, Mark Allan, didn’t appreciate “Football,” until the day he watched and learned. Producer Katie Davis kept a “Basketball Diary” as she coached the kids in her downtown DC team, part of her series Neighborhood Stories. And in spin class, “Everybody Scream,” from the new APM improv podcast, “The Truth, produced by Jonathan Mitchell.” Listen…

2012-08-15 118 Hiker/Biker: Self-Propelled Travels

Self-propelled travels: We walk five thousand miles with a Fanatic Reactionary Pedestrian. We pedal thru Yellowstone and Teton Parks. And we trek with the Queen of Bhutan to remote villages, promoting what-they-call Gross National Happiness. (“The Queen’s Trek” is an Outer Voices production — they were first foreign journalists allowed to accompany a Bhutanese monarch on the trek, and the first to interview the Queen.) Listen…

2012-08-08 112 Native America: Our Nation’s First Nations

A tour of our nation’s First Nations: NPR’s Alex Chadwick rides into the Bitterroot Mountains with Natives and Forest Service workers. We paddle the Pacific Coast with the Canoe Nations of the Northwest. And native poets Henry Real Bird, Joy Harjo, John Trudell and Keith Secola sing us the stories of their homes and ancestors. Listen…

2012-08-01 022 Mushroom Cloud: Tales of the Atomic Age

In “Enola Alone” Antenna Theater interviews bomber pilots, bombing victims, and Colonel Paul Tibbets, pilot of the Enola Gay. Political speeches and popular songs chart our changing attitudes towards the “Atomic Age.” Residents recall the 1950s Nevada and Utah nuclear bomb tests in Claes Andreasson series “Downwinder Diaries.” Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti has “Wild Dreams of a New Beginning.” Americans across the country answer Scott Carrier’s question: “What Are You Afraid Of?” The band Lemon Jelly presents “Page One,” presents the Big Bang with a beat. And we select some “Atomic Platters: Cold War Music from the Golden Age of Homeland Security” compiled by CONELRAD.com. Listen…

July

2012-07-25 110 Mormon Fringe: Life with Latter Day Saints

Practicing polygamy, finding pockets of Polynesian Mormons, and converting the lost Native-American Israelites: “Saints and Indians,” a Homelands Production, on the Latter-Day Saints school for Navaho children — restoring their original place as the lost Kingdom of Isreal. A “Utah Luau” with displaced Hawaiians. And Scott Carrier’s sound-portrait of the “Last Days” plural marriage sects of Manti, Utah. Listen…

2012-07-18 109 Musical Memory: The Soundtrack of Our Lives

The Soundtrack of Our Lives: Selected stories from the series “Musicians in their own words” and “Song and Memory”, which asks the musical question: What one song do your remember most from your childhood? Also Melissa Block interviews musician Abigail Washburn about her project Afterquake: creating sound poetry with the children who survived China’s 2008 earthquake. Listen…

2012-07-11 025 Heat: Lazy-Hazy-Crazy Days of Summer

Symptoms of heat fatigue: A sound-poem for “Dead of Summer” in the city by Marjorie van Halteren & Lou Giansante. Tuscon residents reflect the desert “Heat,” with author Charles Bowden, poet Ofelia Zepeda, and music by Steve Roach; produced by Jeff Rice. The perfection of family, a crippled man on a blind man’s back, and a collective scream of “I’m not dead,” sweat it out in Joe Franks’s “Summer Notes.” Cats pulling pianos are “The Little Heroes” in John Rieger’s Dance on Warning series. And host Scott Carrier takes a long hot cross-country drive down “Highway 50,” the loneliest road in America. Listen…

2012-07-04 138 Out of the Blocks: One City Block, Everybody’s Story

What does an city block sound like? Aaron Henkin of WYPR-Baltimore and electronic/hip hop musician Wendel Patrick hit the streets, and spent several months documenting the stories, voices, and people who populate the 3300 block of Greenmount Avenue, in Baltimore. We go inside the hair salon, the tattoo parlor, and the check cashing business. We talk to a street preacher and homeless street people. This part of the city is a collection of different nationalities, ethnicities, and religions; in other words: an All American block. Listen…

June

2012-06-27 018 Stars and Bars: For Fourth of July

Celebrating America with Flags and Festivals, featuring: Recitations and reflections on “The Pledge” of Allegiance and “War vs. Peace.” The annual “Rainbow Family” migration into the Montana forest on July Fourth — their day of prayer for peace. A town that covets their title of the “Armpit of America” — welcome to Battle Mountain, Nevada. Mississippi moonshine, barbecued goat and old-time Fife & Drum at “Otha Turner’s Afrosippi Picnic.” Stories by Joe Frank, Barrett Golding, host Larry Massett, and Ben Adair. Listen…

2012-06-20 137 In the Mountains: Towards the Summit

Heading towards the summit: NPR’s Alex Chadwick finds the “Ah Toy” Chinese Gardens hidden in the mountains of Idaho’s Payette National Forest. Scott Carrier scales Utah’s Wasatch Range for some spring skiing. Quiet American gathers sounds in Nepalese mountain Towns. Joe Frank attempts an ascent of K2, the planet’s second tallest peak — not all our treks are successful. Listen…

2012-06-06 029 Old School: Back-to-School Special

Richard Paul follows “School VP,” Asst. Principal Irasema Salcido, through her hectic multi-lingual morning at DC’s Bell Multicultural  High School. Host Katie Davis finds she “Got Carried.” Slam poet and  history teacher Taylor Mali schools us on “What Teachers Make.” Producer Hillary Frank gets the shy “Quiet Kids” to speak up. Chicago Tribune columnist Mary Schmich’s commencement speech advises  “Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen),” with music from filmmaker Baz  Luhrman. Host Katie Davis takes her DC summer camp into the wild woods on a “Hike to Rock  Creek,” two blocks from where the kids  live. And poems from Meryn Cadell and Jelani. Listen…

2012-06-13 015 Father Figures: For Father’s Day

Paternal praise, pride, disappointment and love, hosted by Jay Allison (This I Believe): Scott Carrier gives his son Milo a “Ski Lesson.” From Animals and Other Stories, we hear “Reflections of Fathers,” aka, Bugs & Dads. Comic strip artist Lynda Barry wishes her divorced dad a “Happy Father’s Day.” A doctor tells his daughter about her granddad in “Story Corps- Dr. William Weaver.” Jay Allison describes his daughter’s questions about his love life as “Grilling Me Softly”. Dan Robb’s family remembers the day “Dad’s Moving Out,” from Life Stories. “Doc Merrick” and daughter Viki go through some girl problems. David Greenberger tells David Cobb’s story “Because of Dad.” Deirdre Sullivan’s father advises “Always Go to the Funeral,” a This I Believe essay. And from producer by Viki Merrick, Dave Masch wants to be “A Better Father.” Listen…

May

2012-05-30 136 Where Wild Things Are: Maurice Sendak Memorial

A memorial to recently departed cultural innovators: Beastie Boy bassist and rapper Adam Yauch — aka, “MCA,” British hairdresser Vidal Sassoon, pioneer FM rock n’ roll disc jockey Pete Fornatale, and mostly we hear mostly we hear children’s literature author/illustrator Maurice Sendak, along with all the music and movies inspired by his 1963 classic, “Where the Wild Things Are.”
Listen…

2012-05-23 012 For the Fallen: For Memorial Day

Green Beret and poet, Major Robert Schaefer, US Army, hosts the voices of veterans remembering their comrades: We talk with troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, reading their emails, poems, and journals, as part of the NEA project: “Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience.” We hear interviews from StoryCorps, an essay from This I Believe, and the sounds of a Military Honor Guard, recorded by Charles Lane. And we attend the daily “Last Post” ceremony by Belgian veterans honoring the WWI British soldiers who died defending a small town in western Belgium (produced by Marjorie Van Halteren). Listen…

2012-05-16 107 Strange Days: Paul Bowles, Coyle & Sharp, Ayahuasca

Way beyond the norm: Host Larry Massett has an audio essay on the life and literature of Paul Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999). The original mock man-on-the-street interviews, Coyle & Sharpe turn the everyday into the extremely strange. Producer John Rieger is enveloped in an Amazonian Ayahuasca expedition, a tale of ritual drugs and tourism. Listen…

2012-05-09 010 All Mom Radio: For Mother’s Day

For Mother’s Day, maternal tales from producers around the country: “Travels with Mom” follows Larry Massett and his mother to the Tybee Island, Georgia of today and of the 1920’s, as recalled by Mrs. Massett. Writer Beverly Donofrio joins her mom for “Thursday Night Bingo,” produced by Dave Isay of Sound Portraits. In Nancy Updike’s “Mubarak and Margy,” a gay man returns home to care for his mom, and to the “cure” his family plans for his homosexuality. And comedian Amy Borkowsky shares her hilarious phone “Messages from Mom.” Listen…

2012-05-02 106 Courage to Create II: Interviews with Artists

The conclusion of this 1978 NPR/CBC radio classic, featuring interviews with artists on the origins of the creative impulse. Interviewees include psychologist Rolly May (author of The Courage to Create), scupltor Ernst Neizvestny (translation read by Mike Waters), jazz violinist Joe Venuti, composer Harry Somers, classical guitarist Larry Snitzler, dancer Francesca Corkle (Joffrey Ballet), actor/director Jeanne Moreau, stained glass artist Rowan LeCompte, photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. Listen…

April

2012-04-25 105 Courage to Create I: Interviews with Artists

A 1978 NPR/CBC radio classic, featuring interviews with artists on the origins of the creative impulse. This first of two hours includes psychologist Rolly May (author of The Courage to Create), classical guitarist Larry Snitzler, actor/director Jeanne Moreau, pianist Loren Hollander, photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, stained glass artist Rowan LeCompte, mezzo-soprano Fredericka von Stade, painter Harold Town, novelist Marie Claire Blais, flautist Jean-Pierre Rampal, folk guitarist Leo Kotke. Listen…

2012-04-18 007 The Earth Sings: For Earth Day

Host Dmae Roberts of Stories1st.org, for Earth Day, presents Sounds for and from Mother Earth: The Quiet American takes an audio trek through Nepal”s “Annapurna” Circuit. Host Dmae Roberts records Maori music and culture. We hear Pulse of the Planet’s “Extraordinary Sounds From the Natural World.” The band Pamyua mimics creature calls. And from Gregg McVicar and the “Earthsongs” series: Sioux Soprano Bonnie Jo Hunt layers opera over insects (on Robbie Robertson’s Music for the Native Americans). Listen…

2012-04-11 135 Shades of Gray: Life & Choice; Pro-life, Pro-Choice

An hour-long audio mosaic about abortion in America: Pro-choice. Pro-life. Most people have already chosen sides in the ongoing debate, so why revisit the issue? Shades of Gray shares a range of stories told by people young and old who have been directly affected by abortion, instead of the polemics of irreconcilable extremes. It’s a carefully crafted audio mosaic and a stark portrayal of the intensely personal nature of our relationship with abortion. Winner of the 2004 Golden Reel for National Documentary. Listen…

2012-04-04 055 Wordshakers: For Poetry Month

Host Andrei Codrescu’s “Poetry” redux. Lord Alfred Tennyson leads “The Charge of the Light Brigade.” Thomas Edison waxes Walt Whitman’s “America.” Denise Levertov knows “The Secret.” Carl Sandburg wonders “What is Poetry?” (by Barrett Golding). Scott Carrier wonders about “Alex Caldiero- Poet?” Ed Sanders (fmr Fugs) poses “A Question of Fame.” In New Orleans a hot-dog vendor, barkeep, and stripper are in the “Poetry Combine (by Larry Massett). Jan Kerouac responds to her father’s poetry and parenting in “Jan on Jack” (by Marjorie Van Halteren). Allen Ginsberg runs a “Personals Ad.” Listen…

March

2012-03-28 108 Making Music: For a Living, For a Life

Making Music, For a Living, For a Life. 1930s Florida folk music in the turpentine camps — a WPA project with Zora Neale Hurston and Stetson Kennedy. The Maddox Brothers and Rose, a California country star. A North Carolina preacher’s son plays everything on guitar. And a whistler on the streets of Mexico City. Listen…

2012-03-21 134 Close to Death: At Life’s End

It takes “Four Seconds” to hit the water from the Golden Gate Bridge — producer Jake Warga’s friend took that fatal jump. NPR’s Josh Darsa interviews “The Man with the White Cane,” a blind man who fell under a subway train. Carmen Delzell’s 89-year-old “Grandmother’s Hip” is broken. Scott Carrier talks to the family, the doctors, even the grave digger, to everyone affected by “The Death of Ruth Tuck. And we hear an answering machine “Kaddish” for producer Barrett Golding’s father. Listen…

2012-03-14 103 Political Party: For Election Season

Let’s rev-up this election process with a Political Party, crisscrossing the county collecting opinions: Scott Carrier in Salt Lake City watches his mayor debate Fox News host Sean Hannity, as the audience prepares for battle. Oregon kids brief us on the Constitution. Chicago college students discuss politicians. Montana pols talk politics. Howard Dean screams. We hear two opposing musical messages about the Obama administration. And we Auto-Tune the News, turning speeches info songs. Listen…

2012-03-07 133 Destination Unknown: Getting Nowhere, Slow

Getting Nowhere, Slow: Producer Scott Carrier hitchhikes cross-country. Tony Joe White give directions to the swamp. Ben Walker brings books to a Balkan war criminal. Donna, a supermarket check clerk, dreams of faraway places, in the ZBS radio soap, Saratoga Springs. And People Like Us find an Arkansas Explorer. Listen…

February

2012-02-29 003 Her Stories: For Women’s History Month

Host Dmae Roberts of Stories1st.org, for Women’s History Month, presents Stories By, For, and Of Women: The Kitchen Sisters go to “Tupperware®” parties. A supermarket checker checks out her life, in ZBS’s radio soap Saratoga Springs. Jenifir returns “Home From Africa” with all 13 Symptoms of Chronic Peace Corps Withdrawal. Host Dmae Roberts has a collage of and about “Sisters.” In a new syntax of whispers and words Susan Stone tells the story of “Ruby” and her husbands. And Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell perform short poems. Listen…

2012-02-22 100 Stories of Transformation: Character and Change

Two audio diaries about character and change: a street kid who decides to wise-up and a person born in the wrong body. We hear two people documenting their own personal transformation. “Finding Miles” is the story of a person named Megan who began a slow and difficult transition into manhood, into becoming Miles. “Running from Myself” is the story of of boy who used to rob people, and his decision to stop. Listen…

2012-02-15 132 Musicality of Speech: Spoken Melody

A history of what composer Steve Reich call “speech-melodies:” We start with Riech’s 1965 tape-compositions, then move to Reich Remixed, sampled and mashed-up several decades later. Composer Adam Goddard makes music from his grandfather’s stories of “The Change in Farming.” We hear David Byrne and Brian Eno’s spoken-word experiments and a collage called “Fundamentals: Musical Preachers.” And we replay the classic Radiolab story on unintentional music, “Sometimes Behaves So Strangely.” Listen…

2012-02-08 050 Love’s Labors: For Valentine’s Day

Lovelorn letters to an advice columnist. Women’s tales of true but tainted “Cringe Love,” from producer Nancy Updike. A “Valentine” from Kevin Kling. “Love & Marriage Atop the Towers,” stories of weddings at the World Trade Center, collected by The Kitchen Sisters. Host Amy Dickinson and hundreds of other “Leftover Brides,” lining up for mass Moonie marriages. And a “Parent and Child” discussion between Jessica and Scott Carrier on what makes a good marriage.
Listen…

2012-02-01 052 Circus Blood: Under the Big Top

A world-class troupe of audio daredevils and media magicians: SF Chronicle journalist Jon Carroll interviews his daughter Shana as she swings thru the air on her flying “Trapeze”, from the Life Stories series by Jay Allison. Joe Frank loves the lady “Lion Tamer,” an excerpt from his hour “The Dictator.” Adam Rosen mixes a medley of the many versions of “The Lion Sleeps Tonight.” And Elizabeth Eck returns to the circus family she ran away to join, in Larry Massett’s “Circus in the Blood.” Listen…

January 2012

2012-01-25 131 Voices from Tahrir: Portrait of a Revolution

January 25, 2011. One year ago, a revolution began in Cairo’s Tahir Square. For the next eighteen days, millions of Egyptians across the country would demonstrate in the streets, demanding the end of their 30-year dictatorship. They were inspired by Tunisians, whose protests, that same month, had forced out the authoritarian regime of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Now it was time for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to go. A few weeks after the protests, the advocacy group Human Rights Watch interviewed some of the organizers of the January uprising: union leaders, civil rights workers, and young social media activists. These Human Rights Watch interviews provide a rare, eyewitness account of a revolution, told by the Egyptian people, the activists, human rights defenders, and bloggers who persevered during those eighteen days. These are the “Voices from Tahrir. Listen…

2012-01-18 013 Crossing Borders: From Mexico to US

Marcos Martinez, (formerly) of KUNM Alberquerque, hosts A Tale of Two Countries, from Mexico to US: In “Sasabe,” a Sonora, Mexico border town, Scott Carrier talks to immigrants on their hazardous, illegal desert crossing, and to the border patrol waiting for them in Sasabe, Arizona. Luis Alberto Urrea reads from “The Devil”s Highway,” his book about death in the desert. Guillermo Gomez-Pena imagines “Maquiladoras of the Future,” fantasy border factories. “And I walked…”, by Ann Heppermann and Kara Oehler, is a sound-portrait of Mexicans who risk their lives to find better-paying jobs in the United States. Listen…

2012-01-11 130 Shortcuts 2011: A Year in An Hour

Speeches, songs, events, and people who past last year: We hear Queen Elizabeth, Occupy Wall Street, The Arab Spring, Osama Bin-Laden’s death, Japan’s nuclear accidents, North East floods, Texas fires, GOP presidential candidates, Michael Moore, and Charlie Sheen. Music includes: PJ Harvey, Ry Cooder, Fleet Foxes, Bright Eyes, The Coasters, John Barry. Tributes to: Steve Jobs, Jerry Leiber, Andy Rooney, Joe Frasier, Gil Scott Heron, Hubert Sumlin, Wild Man Fischer, Amy Winehouse, Clarence Clemons, Harry Morgan, Sylvia Robinson, Carl Gardner, Wildman Fischer, Phoebe Snow, Jack Lalane. Listen…

2012-01-04 099 Polk Street Stories: San Francisco USA

An oral history of San Francisco’s premiere queer neighborhood, told by those who’ve called it home: Public Historian Joey Plaster spent a year gathering 70+ interviews from people experiencing Polk Street’s transition from a working class queer neighborhood to an upscale entertainment district. Polk Street’s scene predates the modern gay rights movement. It was a world unto itself, ten blocks of low rent hotels, bars and liquor stores, all sandwiched in between the gritty Tenderloin, City Hall, and the ritzy Nob Hill: a home invented by people who had no other home. A Transom Radio special. Listen…

December 2011

2011-12-28 026 Prime Candidates: Portraits of Past Presidential Primaries

Politicians who fancy themselves president tromp thru the New Hampshire mill town of “Claremont,” produced by Larry Massett, Art Silverman and Betty Rogers. The media spin myths out of misquotes in “Democracy and Things Like That” by Sarah Vowell and This American Life. The Language Removal Service concocts the world’s first wordless political debate in their “California Recall Project.” And all this years primary losers re-appear in “Super Tuesday Mixdown,” from Peter Bochan’s series Presidential Shortcuts. Listen…

2011-12-21 129 HanukkahChristmashup: Season’s Greets and Beats

Christmas at a Bagram Air Base hospital, Afghanistan; a tour of the Holy Land, Hannukah military history; a visit to a toy store; and musical Chrismashups. Listen…

2011-12-14 128 Prisoners of War: Battle of the Bulge

In December 1944 the Allies were closing in on Germany. HHitler had a desperate plan to save the Third Reich, a massive assault he believed would so demoralize that the Allies, they would seek a separate peace, leaving only the Russian army on the eastern front. On December 16 the Germans unleashed an offensive that would become the most brutal battle of the European war: the Battle of the Bulge. Nineteen thousand Americans were killed, about the same number were taken prisoner. We hear from four Americans soldiers about their time — before, during and after — in a German POW camp. Listen…

2011-12-07 127 Behind the Beat: Inside Musician’s Minds

Music makers on making music: French vocalist Camille, Brazilian percussionist Cyro Baptista, a Hidden Kitchen at a Mozart Festival, and a high school sax player with immigration issues. Stories from the Kitchen Sisters, Long Haul Productions and the series Musicians in Their Own Words. Listen…

November

2011-11-30 039 Portrait of a Plague: For AIDS Awareness Day

Sister Agnes Ramashiga’s Radio Diaries of “Just Another Day At the World’s Biggest Hospital,” Soweto — 2000 patients check in daily, half HIV positive. Teenager documents their HIV “Positive Life,” by American RadioWorks. Poet Lisa Buscani is “Counting” on her mom’s health advice. “And Trouble Came: An African AIDS Diary” is Laura Kaminsky’s compositon for viola, cello, piano, and stories of Tamakloe: warrior, tailor, AIDS victim. Life-saving meds brought Krandall Kraus back from the dead, like “Lazarus.” And dying mother’s writes her son “Letters to Butchie,” by Sound Portraits. Listen…

2011-11-23 095 Inside the Adoption Circle: Adoptees, Birth Parents, Adoptive Families

First-person accounts from all sides of adoption. Stories about living with questions and searching for answers. We hear from birth families (mothers, siblings and a father), adoptees (both kids and adults), and various adoptive families including open adoption and international adoption (China). Produced for Transom.org by Samantha Broun and Viki Merrick with help from Jay Allison. Listen…

2011-11-16 126 Joe Frank: God and Girls

An hour under the influence of radio maestro and master storyteller Joe Frank, featuring many of Joe’s sonic co-conspirators, including David Cross (Fox “Arrested Development”), Laura Esterman (ZBS “Ruby”), Larry Block (PBS “Sesame Street”), and Grace Zabriskie (“Twn Peaks,” HBO “Big Love”). Deep and dark does not begin to describe the solitary, ponderous melancholia that is a Joe Frank story. Listen…

2011-11-09 075 Veteran’s Day: Iraq and Afghanistan Vets

Voices from the Armed Forces: “Project Healing Waters” teaches wounded warriors, including amputees, to fly-fish; we spend a day catching trout at Rose River Farm in Virginia. “Operation Homecoming” is an NEA book project featuring writings and readings by vets returning from the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. “Winter Soldiers” is testimony by soldiers and marines at the Iraq Veterans Against the War hearings. “Swords to Plowshares” follows a member of the Farmer-Veteran Coalition: farmers helping veterans helping farmers. And the last Vet we hear is from Afghanistan; he’s a former Taliban. Listen…

2011-11-02 125 City of Angels: An Ode to Old L.A.

Joe Frank talk to a homeless man on the streets of Los Angeles. David Greenberger visits Senior Centers in East LA. Pastor Michael Cummings patrols the grounds of at Jordan High School, Watts, California. And we hear excerpts from Tom Russell’s “Hotwalker,” an Americana ode to old LA, the music and the culture, with beat outsiders, religious revivals, and L.A. poet Charles Bukowski. Listen…

October

2011-10-26 074 Bloody Hell: For Halloween

An hour of horror for All Hallows’ Eve, the first half is bloody, the second goes to hell: ESP, dreams and intuition drip “Blood on the Pulpit” by David Greenberger. La Llorona, the crying woman, is Mexico’s bogeyman. ZBS adapts Cherokee writer Craig Strete’s “The Bleeding Man.” FM Einheit delves in Dante’s DivineComedy in a “Radio Inferno.” A woman narrates her found-sound trip to hell with Jesus. Shel Silverstein introduces us to “Monsters I’ve Met.” And the 90 Second Cellphone Chillin’ Theater wonders what’s in “The Box.” Listen…

2011-10-19 124 Walk in the Park: National Parks, Neighborhood Parks

National Parks, Neighborhood Parks: Scott Carrier climbs Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park. Jay Allison goes deep into the Everglades with Lance Corporal James McMullen, author of “Cry of the Panther.” Katie Davis introduces us to her neighbors in William Pierce Community Park, DC. And Yellowstone’s geyser guy, geologist Rick Hutchinson, gets us up close and personal with the Park’s hydrothermal features. Listen…

2011-10-12 073 Home Team: For World Series Season

For the weeks leading to the World Series, baseball stories from the Public Radio Hall of Fame: Host Gwen Macsai takes a swing at singing the National Anthem. Composer Phillip Kent Bimstein plays ball with the St. Louis Cardinals’ “Bushy Wushy Beer Man.” Barrett Golding spends a season with the Rookie League. Singer/playwright Terry Allen defines the many meanings of Dug-Out, amid the emerging early 1890s sport of professional baseball. Listen…

2011-10-05 123 Cystic Fibrosis: Living with CF

Laura Rothenberg audio-documents two years of her life with CF, in the classic Radio Diaries story “My So-Called Lungs.” A new piece by Catie Talarski of WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio, “Four Failings Lungs,” follows two other CF patients; one wants a lung transplant, the other does not. And StoryCorps brings us one of the longest-surviving lung-transplant recipients, Howell Graham, who had both lungs replaced in 1990. Listen…

September

2011-09-28 066 Desert Air: Audio from the Arid Regions

Hot & dry Summer soundscapes: Coyotes, owls, frogs and songbirds are part of “Desert Solitudes,” recorded by Bernie Krause and Ruth Happel. Host Ben Adair (APM Global Climate Change Initiative) heads to the ghost towns, abandoned mines, and billion-year old boulders along Death Valley’s “Mojave Road.” Kraut-rockers Faust dial in “Long Distance Calls in the Desert.” The Quiet American sound-captures a nuclear Nevada Test Site warning sign rattling in a “Desert Sun.” In the early 1990s, SLC producer Scott Carrier found Nevada”s “Battle Mountain” full of sagebrush, solace and stories. Listen…

2011-09-21 102 Lost Critters: Dogs, Cats, a Pig, & 1M Camels

Some Dogs, Some Cats, One Pig, and a Million Camels: Camel racers ride the wild herds of Australia. Leo Grillo’s DELTA Rescue locates lost pets in Los Angeles. Piggles eavdes the butcher block, and wanders the backwoods near Washington DC. And the mythical Mama Chaos leads the feral dogs of Los Alamos. Listen…

2011-09-14 072 Predator: Hunter and Hunted

For hunting season: Hillary Frank’s tale of a teenage babysitter who’s siblings think he’s a werewolf. Mark Allen fears a toy poodle — the most evil entity known to man. Matmos mixes music with North American Mammals. Long Haul Productions witness a PA Spillway, where tourists toss bread, and the carp amass so thickly that ducks walk the fish’s backs for a slice. Norman Strung demonstrates the shrill sound and thrill found in calling for elk. A father and son provide a hunter’s perspective of the annual deer breeding cycle. And Alex Chadwick visits hunts wildlife and the wild life in Idaho. Listen…

2011-09-07 122 Prisoner of Zion: Religious Fundamentals- 9/11/11

Shortly after the World Trade Center fell in autumn 2001, it became clear the United States would invade Afghanistan. Producer Scott Carrier decided he ought to go there too. Why? To see for himself: that’s what writers do. Who are these fanatics, these fundamentalists, the Taliban and the like? And what do they want? For the weekend of 9/11/11, Hearing Voices from NPR presents “Prisoner of Zion.” Carrier narrates his trip to Afghanistan. With his young guide and translator, Najibulla, they tour the horrors of war. Years later Naji tells Scott he must leave his homeland — the dangers for a translator have become extreme. Scott gets Najibulla accepted at Utah Valley University. Naji, it turns out, handles the Mormons quite well, while Scott, teaching at the same school, has a hard time with them. At the end Naji is graduating, about to get married, and start a new job; while Scott wonders whether he can stand teaching another year — or if he’ll wind up on the street like Naji. Listen…

August

2011-08-31 098 Working Class: For Labor Day

What we do for a living: Mohawk ironworkers on the Twin Towers; a Radio Dairy from a scissors sharpener; exercises for existential overworked, undervalued employees; percussive postal clerks in Ghana; a man with 800 jobs; and what happens when there is no work… anywhere: the 1940 Great Depression “Voices from the Dust Bowl.” Listen…

2011-08-24 121 Engine Overdrive: Ode to Internal Combustion

Engine Overdrive: Ode to Internal Combustion. We talk to people with oversized engines: on Harley’s, and Low Riders, at race tracks and drag strips. Music from Big Stick (aka, Drag Racing Underground) and an opera, “The Miracle of Cars,” by Robert Ashley. Off to the races at the Long Beach Grand Prix and the Bonneville Salt Flats. Some classic comedy car ads, and hanging with Hog riders. Listen…

2011-08-17 097 Crow Fair II: Apsaalooke Nation Celebration

The final part of this two-hour special: A century ago the six Crow Reservation Districts came together for a cultural gathering with other Great Plains tribes. The Crow Fair honors that tradition with a “giant family reunion under the Big Sky.” Every August is now Crow Fair in southeastern Montana, with a parade, a Pow Wow, and a rodeo. In 1977 a team of NPR producers and recordists spent a week collecting sounds and interviewing people at this annual event with the Crow people: the Apsaalooke Nation. Listen…

2011-08-10 096 Crow Fair I: Gathering the Tribes

A century ago the six Crow Reservation Districts came together for a cultural gathering with other Great Plains tribes. The Crow Fair honors that tradition with a “giant family reunion under the Big Sky.” Every third weekend of August the Apsaalooke Nation puts on a five-day festival in southeastern Montana, with a parade, Pow Wow, rodeo, and traditional and fancy dancing. In 1977 a team of NPR producers and recordists spent a week collecting sounds and interviewing people at this annual event. This early ambient sound-portrait breathes with the arts and activities of the Crow people. Part one of two. Listen…

2011-08-03 120 Dear Diary: Audio Journals

Audio documents of daily life: From Radio Diaries a Teenage Diary of “Nick In Salt Lake City, from Home School to High School.” Recording an ascent of “Cho Oyo, 8201m,” the sixth highest mountain in the world. A transgender tells her mother she’s gay, in “Dia’s Dairy.” And in “Carmen’s Diaries” a woman rediscovers what she wrote as a girl. Listen…

July

2011-07-27 094 Working with Studs: America’s Greatest Listener

A Transom.org tribute to the great broadcaster and author Studs Terkel (1912-2008): For many years, Transom.org editor, Sydney Lewis, worked side by side with Studs on his radio show and his books. For this remembrance, a blend of documentary and reminiscence, she brings together a crew of Stud’s co-workers. They share great stories and wonderful previously-unheard tape of Studs himself. Listen…

2011-07-20 119 Trouble: From Bad to Worse

From Bad to Worse: A private investigator empathizes with the criminal element. Katie Davis hunts the vermin of her rat-infested DC neighbor. Joe Frank read the nightly news: no wonder we’re all so depressed. And somehow a KGB-led road trip thru the Republic of Georgia has gone wrong. Listen…

2011-07-13 064 Outer Space: Moon and Beyond

The first moon man, launched July 16, landed July 20 1969: Astronauts communicate from beyond earth in “Zero G, & I Feel Fine” and “Last Man on the Moon.” President LBJ and Commander Scott Carpenter have a helium-infused confusing phone conversation. Sonic transmissions from deep in our solar system are sent back by Voyager I and II. The Sun and “space weather” emit “Natural Radio” sounds. Christine Lavin laments the loss of planetary status of “Planet X.” And Laurie Anderson relates a “Night Flight from Houston.” Listen…

2011-07-06 118 Hiker/Biker: Self-Propelled Travels

Self-propelled travels: We walk five thousand miles with a Fanatic Reactionary Pedestrian. We pedal thru Yellowstone and Teton Parks. And we trek with the Queen of Bhutan to remote villages, promoting what-they-call Gross National Happiness. (“The Queen’s Trek” is an Outer Voices production — they were first foreign journalists allowed to accompany a Bhutanese monarch on the trek, and the first to interview the Queen.) Listen…

June

2011-06-29 063 Lincoln Monument: A Civil War

For Independence Day, Old Abe, the Civil War, and its still-present aftermath: NPR recreates the “Gettysburg Address.” An archival recording of Walter Rathvon, who heard that speech live. Musings by poets Langston Hughes and Carl Sandburg. In the 1950s Tony Schwartz recorded an NYC voxpop “Portrait of Lincoln.” Radio Diaries of the last “Civil War Widows,” one Union, one Confederate. Producer Jake Warga goes to battle with “Civil War Re-enacters.” Performance artist damali ayo sits on our city sidewalks collecting “Reparations.” Listen…

2011-06-22 091 Bad Trip: Your Next Vacation

Obscure tours and offbeat retreats thru Americana: Filmmaker Tony Buba takes the Long Haul Productions team around his hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania, a once thriving steel town, now one-tenth the town it was in population. Scott Carrier transports visiting Tibetan monks around the U.S. West. The town of Boonville, California has it’s own language: Boontling, a story by Ginna Allison. And writer Mark Allen tours Universal Studios and pretty much loses his mind. Listen…

2011-06-15 062 Talking Dads: For Father’s Day

Sons, daughters, and dads: Storyteller Kevin Kling shares pancakes with his “Dad.” Sarah Vowell is a gunsmith’s daughter, in “Shooting Dad.” Joe Frank lets us eavesdrop on a father-son phone call between Larry and Zachary Block. Host Larry Massett and several other sons try to get to know their “Lost and Found Fathers.” Listen…

2011-06-08 117 War Torn: Weapons-Grade Radio

A weapons-grade hour of wartime radio: The people who start the fight, and the people who pay the price. The words of Churchill, Bush, Rumsfeld, LBJ, MacNamara, J. Robert Oppenhiemer, and a Hiroshima survivor. Carl Sandburg reads his poem “The Unknown War.” Scott Carrier reports from an Afghan battlefield in November 2001. Ryuichi Sakamoto has a musical contemplation of “War & Peace.” And “Prayer Circle: Path to Zero,” a CD for global nuclear disarmament. Listen…

2011-06-01 116 Homeless: Living on the Streets

The voices of people who were or are homeless: Carmen Delzell takes “Crazy John” into her home. Scott Carrier spends a night in DC “Gospel Mission” shelter. The “Land of 10,000 Homeless” is a Minneapolis music/audio documentary project. Dmae Roberts interviews a young homeless girl in “Miracle on the Streets.” The Homeless Writers Coalition performs poetry put to music. Homeless people tell their stories to StoryCorps. And the Kitchen Sisters visit with street and low-income people whose main cooking utensil is the the “George Foreman Grill.” Listen…

May

2011-05-25 059 War Memorial: Return to Vietnam

For Memorial Day, two stories recorded in Vietnam: In 1966, a young Lance Corporal carried a reel-to reel tape recorder with him. He made tapes of his friends, of life in fighting holes, of combat, until, two months later, when he was killed in action. His friend and fellow marine remembers him in “The Vietnam Tapes of Michael A. Baronowski” (by Jay Allison for Lost & Found Sound). And host Alex Chadwick’s first trip to Southeast Asia was as a soldier in the Sixties. Two decades later, as a journalist, he makes a “Return to Vietnam” to find what has and hasn’t changed since the war. Listen…

2011-05-18 090 On Horseback: Equine Athletes

A couple equestrian classics from the NPR archives: Olympian Bruce Davidson shares his techniques for training equine athletes, with NPR’s David Molpus. Josh Darsa and a team of sound-recordists are at Belmont Stakes for the third leg of the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing. And a poem by singer Annie Gallop about the poem that unleashed her love of horses. Listen…

2011-05-11 115 Refugees: Forced to Leave

The journeys of people driven from their homeland by war, disaster, and religious and political persecution: We travel “From Afghanistan to Amarillo,” “From Sudan to Omaha,” “From Burma to Indianapolis,” and “From Iraq to Detroit” (stories in the One Thing series). Mountain Music Project records “Blues for the Karen” in a Thai/Burma border refugee camp. A “Cargo Flight to Somewhere” starts in the Congo and ends in an airport detention center (a song/story for Crossing the BLVD project, Queens NYC). And “Refugee Dreams” of Vietnamese, Laotians, and Cambodians, now living in Portland, Oregon (Crossing East story). Listen…

2011-05-04 058 Motherly Love: Moms, Young and Old

For Mother’s Day: The Radio Diaries of “Melissa, Teen Mom” move her from foster home to starting her own family. Muriel & Walter Murch compose “A Mother’s Symphony” from womb sounds. Amy Jo, single mother of two toddlers, is “Surrounded by Lights” (producer: Erin Mishkin). Myra Dean tells StoryCorps of the day her son was killed. Ben Adair takes his mom in search of “Family Baggage.” Toronto musician Charles Spearin with his neighbor “Mrs. Morris,” in The Happiness Project. Katie Davis admits “I Live with My Mother.” And Jake Warga’s “Far Side” calendars make metaphor and memories of his mother’s life and death. Listen…

April

2011-04-27 089 Musicians’ Minds: Interviewing Music Makers

Musicians minds sometimes work differently. So interviews with musicians sometimes take unexpected turns: Host Lynne Neary’s interview with David Byrne ends up with her answering his questions. Mickey Hart takes us on an audio tour of his extensive worldwide percussion collection. Negativland turns their NPR interview into audio art. Musicians In Their Own Words surveys the sonic spectrum of musicians warming up for a performance. Listen…

2011-04-20 114 Psychological: States Of Mental Health

States Of Mental Health, in three diagnoses: Depression, Amnesia, and Mental Breakdown. Cameron Ledoux talks with his dad about his father’s depression. Scott Carrier goes looking for amnesia victims. And a sonic journey into the depths of mental breakdown — a first-person account told by the person losing grip on reality, and her friends who witnessed the descent. Listen…

2011-04-13 088 Scene of the Crime: Victims, Cops, and Criminals

There will be blood: An archival interview with 1950s NYC crime scene photographer, Weegee; then excerpts from old time radio’s “Casey, Crime Photographer” and “Dragnet.” Nancy Updike of This American Life spends the day with professional “Crime Scene Cleaners.” A sound-portrait of a convicted “White Collar Criminal,” by Adam Allington. And host Jake Warga does a good deed, for which he ends up assaulted, bleeding, and hospitalized. Listen…

2011-04-06 087 Thumb and Thumber: The Joy of Hitchhiking

Is hitchhiking the great American adventure sport or just a risky last resort for folks who can’t come up with bus fare? Producer Jonathan Mitchell offers a “Beginner’s Guide to Hitchhiking”. Scott Carrier relates a hitchhiking adventure involving “New Shoes” and a letter to the Dalai Lama. And host Larry Massett drives a battered Olds 88 from New Mexico to Florida, picking up every hitchhiker on “The Road” he sees — no matter how dangerous-looking. Listen…

March

2011-03-30 113 Hippies: Flying our Freak Flag

Tuned in and turned on: Interviews with Merry Pranksters (Carolyn Garcia and George Walker). The Beautiful People remixes Jimi Hendrix. Johhny Depp conjures Hunter S Thompson. And a walk down Haight Street, looking for the lost generation of the 1960s. Listen…

2011-03-23 085 Protest: From the National Mall to Town Halls

We hear crowds and confrontations at the “Town Halls 2009″ collective cross-country chaos. “Protest 1968-2008″ is four decades of marches and musics, montaged by Ann Heppermann and Kara Oehler. Scott Carrier introduces a junta-threatening Burmese rock band, Iron Cross. Tea Partiers and single-payer proponents shout outside a Presidential health care whistle stop; there’s debate, division and a “Day of Democracy”. NPR’s Jeff Kamen takes to the DC streets amid a police crackdown on an anti-war rally — from ATC’s first broadcast day (May 1971). Listen…

2011-03-16 112 Native America: Our Nation’s First Nations

A tour of our nation’s First Nations: NPR’s Alex Chadwick rides into the Bitterroot Mountains with Natives and Forest Service workers. We paddle the Pacific Coast with the Canoe Nations of the Northwest. And native poets Henry Real Bird, Joy Harjo, John Trudell and Keith Secola sing us the stories of their homes and ancestors. Listen…

2011-03-09 086 WHER-Memphis: All Girl Radio

The first all-girl radio station in the nation, WHER-Memphis, went on-air in 1955. It was the brainchild of sound legend Sam Phillips, who created the groundbreaking format with money he raised from selling Elvis Presley’s Sun Studios contract. Women almost exclusively ran the station. They read the news, interviewed local celebrities, and spun popular records. They sold and produced commercials, directed and engineered programming, and sat at the station’s control boards. “WHER: 1000 Beautiful Watts” was produced by the Kitchen Sisters for their Lost and Found Sound series. Listen…

2011-03-02 071 Vietnam Vets: Coming Home

The sounds of Saigon, 1972: in combat, on the radio, in the streets, were recorded by Claude Johner for the Folkways recording “Good Morning, Vietnam. Doug Peacock, former Green Beret medic, deals with the PTSD of vets, including himself (interviewed by Scott Carrier). Rich Kepler’s war experiences were bottled up and about to burst, until he released them in his poetry (producer: Larry Massett). And producer Katie Davis talks with African American vets, a sound-portrait based on the book Bloods: Black Veterans of the Vietnam War: An Oral History by Wallace Terry. Listen…

February

2011-02-23 111 Guitar Heroes: Pickers, Pluckers, Players

Pickers, Pluckers, Players: The bad man of blues guitar, Charley Patton. A Master Class with classical guitarist Christopher Parkening, narrated by Susan Stamberg. Bass and steel guitarist Musicians In Their Own Words. Learning to play with Lemon Jelly and Birdsongs of the Mesozoic. And Asian stringed instruments recorded by the Mountain Music Project. Listen…

2011-02-16 110 Mormon Fringe: Life with Latter Day Saints

Practicing polygamy, finding pockets of Polynesian Mormons, and converting the lost Native-American Israelites: “Saints and Indians,” a Homelands Production, on the Latter-Day Saints school for Navaho children — restoring their original place as the lost Kingdom of Isreal. A “Utah Luau” with displaced Hawaiians. And Scott Carrier’s sound-portrait of the “Last Days” plural marriage sects of Manti, Utah. Listen…

2011-02-09 053 Ranchers: Life, Death, Land, and Livestock

Life, Death, Land, and Livestock: We spend a year on a sheep ranch, lambing, shearing, selling and “Counting Sheep.” Musician Phillip Bimstien bases his classical composition, “Garland Hirschi’s Cows,” on the voice of a Rockville, Utah cattle-man. And 97-year-old rancher is “Holding His Ground” (produced by Jesikah Maria Ross for Stories from Heart of the Land and Saving the Sierra). Listen…

2011-02-02 109 Musical Memory: The Soundtrack of Our Lives

The Soundtrack of Our Lives: Selected stories from the series “Musicians in their own words” and “Song and Memory”, which asks the musical question: What one song do your remember most from your childhood? Also Melissa Block interviews musician Abigail Washburn about her project Afterquake: creating sound poetry with the children who survived China’s 2008 earthquake. Listen…

January

2011-01-26 084 Place Your Bets: What Happens in Vegas

We play keno, cards, and craps in Sin City: Scott Carrier stays up all night in America’s gambling Mecca: “Vegas”, baby. “Casino Suite” is three pieces for strings, winds, and Vegas dice table worker, composed by Phillip Kent Bimstein. Jazz bassist Kelly Roberti lost his bass to the “Keno Machines”. NPR host Alex Chadwick pits his wits against the casino regular playing “Poker at the Ox”. Joe Frank’s “Old Gambler” gets on the wrong side of Sin City’s collection crew. And playwright John Ridley’s “Lock It Up” is set inside the Hollywood Park Casino, which is neither in Hollywood nor a park. Listen…

2011-01-19 108 Making Music: For a Living, For a Life

Making Music, For a Living, For a Life. 1930s Florida folk music in the turpentine camps — a WPA project with Zora Neale Hurston and Stetson Kennedy. The Maddox Brothers and Rose, a California country star. A North Carolina preacher’s son plays everything on guitar. And a whistler on the streets of Mexico City. Listen…

2011-01-12 079 Sacred Places: Maps to Heaven

Host Alex Chadwick charts “The Geography of Heaven” from the holy Hindu city of Vrindavan, India. Barrett Golding finds “Sacred Spaces” around Montana in a Buddhist woman’s home, a Methodist prairie church, a Soiux Sundance, and a sculptor’s ranch. Dmae Roberts climbs to a “Temple in Taiwan” with 100 people singing. Judith Sloan gathers “Incantations” in Queens, New York, prayers from churches, mosques, synagogues, apartments, and public gatherings. And Hammad Ahmed get’s “Lost in Ritual” with American Muslims searching for places to pray and ways to find Mecca five times daily. Listen…

2011-01-05 080 Elvis Aaron Presley: Birthday Party

Elvis Presley (Jan 8 1935 – Aug 16 1977), a Birthday Party for the King: Long Haul Productions rides the bus to Graceland, talking to the EP pilgrims. Producer Adam Allington rides along with a policeman and Elvis impersonator. The Residents storytell the allegorical “Baby King.” Knonos Quartet performs “Elvis Everywhere”. Gillian Welch expounds her biographical song “Elvis Presley Blues”. Go Home Productions mashes up a “Strung-Out King” on-stage meltdown. And from Joyride Media & Sony’s Elvis 75 project, we hear Elvis’ friends and bandmates recall his righteous faith in both religion and rockin’. Listen…

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