Author: BG/Archives

Dorothy Eck, political person

Dorothy Eck and the Montana Constitution (photo: Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez, Bozeman Daily Chronicle )

Dorothy Eck, Montana State Senator and co-author of the 1972 Montana Constitution, passed away this month.

She was one of the “Political People” who talked politics with us for this 1992 NPR All Things Considered story. Hear her @1:55 (“I don’t look at party platforms, they’re mostly baloney.”) and at @4:55 (“Who said democracy is easy?”):

The world needs more like her — Dorothy Eck (January 23, 1924 – September 23, 2017):

Photo: by Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez, Bozeman Daily Chronicle

NPR reran the piece in 2008:

HV135- Shades of Gray

A diagram of a vacuum aspiration abortion procedure at 8 weeks gestation, from WikipediaHearing Voices from NPR®
135 Shades of Gray: Life & Choice
Host: Ahri Golden of Thin Air Media
Airs week of: 2012-04-11

“Shades of Gray” (52:00 mp3):

An audio mosaic about abortion in America:

“Shades of Gray” (52:00) Jonathan Mitchell & Ahri Golden

Pro-choice. Pro-life. Most people have already chosen sides in the ongoing debate, so why revisit the issue? Shades of Gray shares a range of stories told by people young and old who have been directly affected by abortion, instead of the polemics of irreconcilable extremes. It’s a carefully crafted audio mosaic and a stark portrayal of the intensely personal nature of our relationship with abortion. This is the fair and frank discussion America rarely has but desperately needs.

Winner of the 2004 Golden Reel for National Documentary. A longer version is at PRX. Produced and original music score by Jonathan Mitchell of The Truth. Co-produced and narrated by Ahri Golden of Thin Air Media.

Eleven: Sara and Pogo

Damn this guy’s good, another Pogo creation:

This is my remix of an original song by SaraSinger42: youtube.com/SaraSinger42

The video was shot by Sara’s mother, singer and song writer Jackie Messenger: youtube.com/JackieMessenger. Sara is part of a beautiful family who have always been wonderfully supportive of me.

This track came about almost immediately when I found Sara’s channel. I wondered what her song would sound like with a beat, so I spent around 10 minutes knocking together a drum sequence before layering in her song. 45 minutes later, I seem to have spontaneously put together a complete track.
—Pogo

Read all about it: Eleven (SaraSinger42 Remix) on Vimeo.

HV132- Musicality of Speech

Musical notation of spoken word, by Diana DeutschHearing Voices from NPR®
132 Musicality of Speech: Spoken Melody
Host: Barrett Golding of Hearing Voices
Airs week of: 2012-02-15

This program contains copyrighted material not licensed for web-streaming, so we cannot offer an mp3 of this week’s episode.

A history of what composer Steve Reich calls speech-melodies:

“It’s Gonna Rain” (1966 / 1:00 excerpt)
“Come Out” (1966 / 3:00 excerpt) Steve Reich

“It’s Gonna Rain” was composed in San Francisco in January 1965. The voice belongs to a young black Pentecostal preacher who called himself Brother Walter. I recorded him along with the pigeons and traffic one Sunday afternoon in Union Square in downtown San Francisco. Later at home I started playing with tape loops of his voice and, by accident, discovered the process of letting two identical loops go gradually out of phase with each other.

In the first part of the piece the two loops are lined up in unison, gradually move completely out of phase with each other, and then slowly move back to unison. In the second part two much longer loops gradually begin to go out of phase with each other. This two-voice relationship is then doubled to four with two voices going out of phase with the other two. Finally the process moves to eight voices and the effect is a kind of controlled chaos, which may be appropriate to the subject matter – the end of the world.

“It’s Gonna Rain” is the first piece ever to use the process of gradually shifting phase relations between two or more identical repeating patterns. The second was “Come Out.” Composed in 1966, it was originally part of a benefit presented at Town Hall in New York City for the retrial, with lawyers of their own choosing, of the six boys arrested for murder during the Harlem riots of 1964. The voice is that of Daniel Hamm, now acquitted and then 19, describing a beating he took in Harlem’s 28th precinct station. The police were about to take the boys out to be “cleaned up” and were only taking those that were visibly bleeding. Since Hamm had no actual open bleeding he proceeded to squeeze open a bruise on his leg so that he would be taken to the hospital.

“I had to like open the bruise up and let some of the bruise blood come out to show them.” More…

a transect – Due East

Walking, maps, and art — some of my favorite stuff — are all wrapped up in one project, “a transect – Due East:”

A body of work based on a series of cross-country hikes that enabled me to generate visual and written notation, correspondence, interviews and historic research. The location is specific to my homeland in the San Joaquin Valley of California where I traveled due east into the foothills and Sierra Nevada Mountains.
–Matthew Rangel, Project Statement

Due East through Elliot Ranch, 2008, lithograph, 22" x 28.5", by Matthew RangelDue East through Elliot Ranch, 2008,
lithograph, 22″ x 28.5″, by Matthew Rangel

A PDF of the collection is at the artist’s site: “a transect – Due East.”

Clothesline Revival

It’s like these 1940s movies were made just so, 70 years later, they could accompany the music of Clothesline Revival:

Clothesline Revival has a couple HV connections. They helped create a mess in our Food Fight episode. And we produced the NPR Story “Clothesline Revival’s ‘Long Gone’” (also check NPR’s “Music Review: ‘Of My Native Land’ from Clothesline Revival“).

CR samples extensively from ancient audio archives, especially in their first two CDs, Of My Native Land and Long Gone. Their latest, featuring “Voice of the Lobster” — the song in the vid — is They Came From Somewhere.

Clothesline Revival is Paleo Music: space | face.

HV131- Voices from Tahrir

On April 1, 2011, Egyptians returned to Tahrir Square in Cairo for a rally to save the revolution, photo: Platon for Human Rights Watch Hearing Voices from NPR®
131 Voices from Tahrir: Portrait of a Revolution
Host: Heba Morayef of Human Rights Watch
Airs week of: 2012-01-25

“Voices from Tahrir” (52:00 mp3):

Bread, Freedom, and Human Dignity:

“Voice from Tahrir” (52:00) Human Rights Watch

January 25, 2011. One year ago, a revolution began in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. For the next eighteen days, millions of Egyptians across the country would demonstrate in the streets, demanding the end of their 30-year dictatorship. They were inspired by Tunisians, whose protests, that same month, had forced out the authoritarian regime of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Now it was time for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to go.

A few weeks after the protests, the advocacy group Human Rights Watch interviewed some of the organizers of the January uprising: union leaders, civil rights workers, young social media activists, family members of of murdered protestors, and mothers who brought their kids to Tahrir to clean after the protests.. These Human Rights Watch interviews provide a rare, eyewitness account of a revolution, told by the Egyptian people, the activists, human rights defenders, and bloggers who persevered during those eighteen days.

The hour features recordings made in the square by reporters and citizen jounalists from around the world, including Daniel Finnan of Radio France Internationale, Al Jazeera, Egypt Daily News, Ramy Roof, and Matthew Cassel of Just Image.org.

Music: “Erhal (Leave)” and “Laugh, Revolution” by Ramy Essam; “Ezzay? (Why?)” by Mohamed Mounir and “Gomaa Hayran (Uncertain Friday)” by Joseph & James Tawadros
from the collection Our Dreams Are Our Weapons – Soundtracks of the Revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt. Mix: Robin Wise of Sound Imagery.

More…

xkcd: Sustainable

For decades we in pubradio have been hearing about a mystical “sustainable” creature, s’posed to be lurking around our endeavors: sustainable series, sustainable projects, sustainable programs. Well, ‘cording to the latest xkcd, we’re not alone in constantly chasing but never finding that mythical phantom:

xkcd comic: The word sustainable is unsustainable

HV130- Shortcuts 2011

2011 graphic textHearing Voices from NPR®
130 Shortcuts 2011: A Year in An Hour
Host: Peter Bochan of WPKN-FM
Airs week of: 2012-01-11

“Shortcuts 2011” (52:00 mp3):

“Shortcuts 2011” (52:00) Peter Bochan

A retrospective of the past twelve months featuring Queen Elizabeth, Occupy Wall Street, The Arab Spring, the death of Osama Bin-Laden, the extreme weather conditions that caused nuclear accidents in Japan, flooding in the North East and fires across Texas, politicians like Rick Perry, Michelle Bachman, Ron Paul and Herman Cain making us proud, Michael Moore, Guido Sarducci, Charlie Sheen, Ali G, Newt Gingrich with music from PJ Harvey, Ry Cooder, Fleet Foxes, Bright Eyes, The Coasters, Bruce Springsteen, Gil Scott-Heron, Ashford & Simpson, John Barry, Tosca, Maceo Plex, Mickie & Sylvia, The Drifters, Amy Winehouse, Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell and many others.

Tributes to Steve Jobs, Jerry Leiber, Nick Ashford, Andy Rooney, Joe Frasier, Gil Scott Heron, Hubert Sumlin, Wild Man Fischer, Amy Winehouse, Clarence Clemons, Harry Morgan, Sylvia Robinson, Carl Gardner, Wildman Fischer, Phoebe Snow, Jack Lalane, and others

Produced by Peter Bochan, General Manager of WPKN-Bridgeport CT, announcer WBAI-NYC NY, and mixmaster at All Mixed Up Productions. His Shortcuts and other mixes are at PRX.

Some of the music in the hour:
“The Glorious Land” PJ Harvey – Let England Shake
“No Banker Left Behind” Ry Cooder – Pull Up Some dust and Sit Down
“Firewall” Bright Eyes – Firewall
“My First” Tosca – No Hassle
“Helplessness Blues” Fleet Foxes – Helplessness Blues
“Poetry Man” Phoebe Snow (Phoebe Ann Laub, July 17, 1950 – April 26, 2011) – Phoebe Snow
“Jungleland (live)” Bruce Springsteen- Born to Run
(Clarence Anicholas Clemons, Jr., January 11, 1942 – June 18, 2011)
“You Know I’m No Good (live)” Amy Winehouse (14 September 1983 – 23 July 2011)
“Love is Strange” Mickey & Sylvia (Sylvia Robinson, March 6, 1936 – September 29, 2011)
“I’m New Here” Gil Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011) – I’m New Here

Songs by Jerry Leiber (April 25, 1933 – August 22, 2011) and Mike Stoller:
“Three Cool Cats” The Coasters
“Kansas City” Wilbert Harrison
“Smokey Joe’s Cafe” – The Robins (Coasters)
“Spanish Harlem” Ben E. King (Jerry Leiber and Phil Spector)

Songs by Nickolas Ashford (May 4, 1941 – August 22, 2011) & Valerie Simpson:
“Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell
“Solid” Ashford & Simpson – Solid

2011 graphic from Tennessee State Parks.

Western Soundscape Archive

Western Soundscape Archive logoThe Western Soundscape Archive houses thousands of audio recordings: “570 different Western bird species, all of the region’s vocalizing frogs and toads, dozens of reptiles and more than 100 different types of mammals,” with dozens ambient field soundscapes of the West remote wildlands. Many of the recordings are are Creative Commons licensed for non-comm use.

Here’s a few of their Featured Sounds – some from HV’s Jeff Rice, a lead archivist and audio recordist for the WSA…

Yellow-headed Parrot, Pasadena, CaliforniaYellow-headed Parrot
Amazona oratrix
Recorded in Pasadena, California
(0:14 mp3):
Northern Elephant Seal at Ano Nuevo State Reserve (California) - Male adultNorthern Elephant Seal (Adult Male)
Mirounga angustirostris
Recorded in Ano Nuevo State Reserve, San Mateo County, California
(0:15 mp3):
Relict leopard frog, Lake Mead National Recreation Area (Ariz. and Nev.); Mohave County (Ariz.); ArizonaRelict Leopard Frog
Rana onca
Recorded in Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Mohave County, Arizona
(1:40 mp3):

Move

MOVE” by director Rick Mereki:

3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage… all to turn 3 ambitious linear concepts based on movement, learning and food ….into 3 beautiful and hopefully compelling short films…..

= a trip of a lifetime.

move, eat, learn

Rick Mereki:: Director, producer, additional camera and editing
Tim White : DOP, producer, primary editing, sound
Andrew Lees : Actor, mover, groover
Commissioned by STA Travel Australia
Music:” “Play On” composed & performed by Kelsey James (myspace | iTunes)

More info at Vimeo (and on YouTube.)

via ToriTown.

Fulton’s Frogs

ZBS Foundation logoThe ZBS Foundation has long been at the forefront of the dramatic radio arts. Their podcast is a great survey of their audio excursions, mixing flights of fancy with real sound effects.

Meatball Fulton, ZBS producerCheck Podcast #8, “Weird Frogs” (7:55 mp3):

“Meatball Fulton plays really weird frogs he recorded in the Amazon, Bali, Lombok, Mexico, and the Brazilian Pantanal.”

There’s more “Singing Frogs of the Pantanal” in this story produced by ZBS for us and Living on Earth (3:54 mp3):